EXPERIMENTAL CACOPHONIES: 910 Noise goes spacey with ‘Stardust’

Dec 5 • Art, ARTSY SMARTSY, FEATURE BOTTOM, Reviews, Interviews and FeaturesNo Comments on EXPERIMENTAL CACOPHONIES: 910 Noise goes spacey with ‘Stardust’

A decade or so ago, a group of ambient sound artists began a local collective, 910 Noise, to spread their alternative takes on what music and art actually is. They held festivals at the original Bottega on Front Street and a few doors down at the now-defunct Soapbox and on Fourth Street where Squidco used to be to get their DIY sounds out to the masses. Among them were Grant Stewart of subterrene and solo artist Carl Kruger. Today, Noise 910 play all over town and will begin doing monthly gigs at the Juggling Gypsy.

“Viewing sound as an experience unique in and of itself, and applying that idea to other mediums,” according to Kruger is the mission of 910 Noise to challenge diversity of art across the Port City. They’ve released four compilation CDs to date, featuring everything from harsh noise, to musique concrete, drone and beyond. Bands like Authorless, Changes to Blind, Mr. Stonecipher, Jason Ward, The Waking Life, and Baby Daddy, Reverse Animals, and Dip Lip have contributed.

Stewart and Kruger will be performing live as part of “Stardust” and are devising their own audio and visuals that will permeate the gallery’s back patio on Friday evening (picture to the right is an example of imagery used in Kruger’s video projections). Stewart says they will have created their own tracks and loops that will be live interpretations of the exhibit’s concept.

“I have some material that goes well with the idea of space and time,” Stewart tells. “The complexly harmonious or destructive sounds that can be made with distortion are a big part of what I do—the sound of radio waves between the stars, galaxies colliding, background radiation…”

“It’s sound we will be improvising, using live sampling and sound processing,” Kruger adds. “The theme is a specific starting point for the audience to approach the show. The idea of removing sound from the gestural constraints modal music places on it is a new concept to people.”

While it may seem abstract at the onset, it’s more an immersive experience. like an installation experienced at an art museum, that will impact the audience’s senses. Video projections and sounds will be unique to the evening and the theme, so it must be seen and heard first-hand to be understood.

“Trusting an audience is key,” Kruger says of any show’s success, “as is leaving the idea of cohesiveness up to their individual experiences.”

There is really no beginning and no ending to the installation. Participants can readily drop in at any time, 7 p.m. – 10 p.m., during Stardust’s reception to be a part of the experiment.

“Isn’t stardust something insubstantial?” Stewart asks rhetorically. “That takes sometimes intense energy to capture, such as the satellite that crashed when it returned with its cargo of stardust a few years ago? There you go: something nebulous and something explosive.”

Details:
Stardust * Picture This
Artist reception, featuring multiple artists and genres, including light and sound installations
Fri., Dec. 8, 7 p.m. – 10 p.m.
Bottega Art Gallery and Wine Bar
723 N. 4th St.• Free

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

« »