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Onstage This Week:

RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME: Dr. John and the Lower 911 play Greenfield Lake Amphietheatre tonight, Wednesday, Oct. 5th. Courtesy photo.

RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME: Dr. John and the Lower 911 play Greenfield Lake Amphietheatre tonight, Wednesday, Oct. 5th. Courtesy photo.

Whether looking for a big-name act or the underground indie kids to provide a more intimate show, we’ve got it covered.

Wednesday, October 5th
Dr. John and the Lower 911
Greenfield Lake Amphitheatre
$35 before/$40 at gate

Originally named Mac Rebennack who transformed in to the Night Tripper before becoming simply Dr. John, the pianist’s amazing score of music for over 50 years pays homage not just to his love of New Orleans but for the funky and jaunty rhythms of blues and jazz, rock ‘n’ roll and pop, and all mise en place of timbre and sound in between. Dr. John covers Zydeco music in a fashion suited for the most eclectic form of musical gumbos, wherein his piano keys become the foundation for colorful roustings.

The legend’s debut at Greenfield Lake Amphitheatre takes place Wednesday evening. He’ll play from a catalog of music destined by legendary creation, from his 1968 debut “Gris-Gris” up to “Desitively Bonnaroo” (yes, the inspiration for the world-famous festival taking place annually in Tennessee) and “Gumbo” (ranked among Rolling Stone’s top 500 albums of all time). He’s collaborated with the most influential artists, from Ringo Starr to The Band, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011.
He and his band, the Lower 911, will perform with verve unprecedented on the Greenfield stage. Folks can expect a spectacle of a theatrical performance as the Grammy-award winner likely will bring “Right Place, Wrong Time,” “Gris-Gris Gumbo Ya Ya,” “Iko, Iko” and other hits to life.

Tickets are available at Gravity Records, thepenguin983.com or at the gate, which open at 5:30 p.m. Eric Lindell, the opening act, goes on at 6 p.m. and Dr. John follows around 7 p.m. The show is on a 9 p.m. curfew. It’ll be the best $35 spent all week long—guaranteed.

Friday, October 7th
The Rosebuds, with Mount Moriah
Pour House Music Hall
$10 – $13

Nothing provides a better show than welcoming a Merge Records-signed band back home to stage. The pop-infused sounds of The Rosebuds will make their way to downtown Wilmington’s newly opened Pour House Music Hall for a romp with fans. Joining them: the mellow rock of Durham’s Mount Moriah featuring Heather McEntire, also of local fame from her Bellafea days.

Together, this dual bill will plaster downtown with unmatched tunes, as The Rosebuds play from their latest release, “Loud Planes Fly Low.” Ivan Howard (vocals/guitar/drums/bass/keyboards/programming) and Kelly Crisp, once a married team but now only relegated to music partners, have developed sweetly infectious songs, as heard on “Go Ahead” and “Limitless Arms.”

They’ve been touring all summer with Bon Iver after kicking off their tour’s debut to a packed house in Wilmington’s Brooklyn Arts Center last spring. It’s a fitting return to celebrate the indie-rock darlings along downtown’s cobbelstone streets.

Tickets are only $10 in advance and $13 at the door, which opens at 8 p.m. Show starts at 10 p.m. Pour House Music Hall is located at 127 Princess Street.

Saturday, October 8th
Machine Funk
The Whiskey, 10 p.m.

They hail from Florence, SC, but they bring with them the jammed-up and funked-out sounds of Georgia’s Widespread Panic. Sean Mills, Trent Severance, Michael Araujo, Greg Buie, Andy Branan and Adam Brown keep the noodling alive as they play from WP’s massive catalog, changing their set nightly so fans never hear the same show twice.

Having shared the stage with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Machine Funk also cover the likes of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Talking Heads. The show is for 21 years and older and sells out practically every time they play. Come early; admission charged.

Monday, October 10th
John Prine’s Birthday Celebration,
various artists
Reel Cafe, free

He’s a legendary songwriter, bringing simple acoustic rhythms to light with a penchant for stalwart storytelling. John Prine has dedicated his career to breathing impressive country/folk/Americana after gracing open-mics with his song-dabbling hobby in the 1960s. Today, he has released more than a dozen records, secured a Lifetime Achievement Award for songwriting by the UK’s BBC Radio 2 in 2003, an Artist of the Year award at the Americana Music Awards in 2005 and continues inspring the greats. Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson and even Roger Waters all tout his indispensable songwriting talent.
Susan Savia’s Stone Soup Concerts celebrates Prine’s 65 years of life and his contribution to music at Reel Café at 7:30 p.m. She and 25 musicians take to the stage to perform two songs each from Prine’s catalog of music. Though the man himself won’t be there, the tribute payed to him will be magnificent. Oh, and the event is free!

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Jensen Lee

    October 4, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    Dr. John is best known for his hits “Right Place Wrong Time” and “Such a Night,” but it was his first single, “Iko Iko,” from the 1972 album “Dr. John’s Gumbo,” that introduced his New Orleans sound to the rest of the country. For most listeners, “Iko Iko” was a cover of the 1965 Dixie Cups hit. But the song’s ancestry goes back to 1952… and beyond. Rockaeology at http://bit.ly/gL5n0B tells how the song has roots in the chants of Mardi Gras krewes. The lyrics of James “Sugar Boy” Crawford’s “Jock-A-Mo” unwittingly served as the inspiration for the Dixie Cups’ hit.

  2. Jensen Lee

    October 4, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    Dr. John is best known for his hits “Right Place Wrong Time” and “Such a Night,” but it was his first single, “Iko Iko,” from the 1972 album “Dr. John’s Gumbo,” that introduced his New Orleans sound to the rest of the country. For most listeners, “Iko Iko” was a cover of the 1965 Dixie Cups hit. But the song’s ancestry goes back to 1952… and beyond. Rockaeology at http://bit.ly/gL5n0B tells how the song has roots in the chants of Mardi Gras krewes. The lyrics of James “Sugar Boy” Crawford’s “Jock-A-Mo” unwittingly served as the inspiration for the Dixie Cups’ hit.

  3. Jim Hobbs

    October 6, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    Dr. John is one of the finest living musicians to come out of New Orleans, and he is not a zydeco artist nor does he play zydeco. His music comes from rhythm and blues, from a style born in New Orleans.

  4. Jim Hobbs

    October 6, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    Dr. John is one of the finest living musicians to come out of New Orleans, and he is not a zydeco artist nor does he play zydeco. His music comes from rhythm and blues, from a style born in New Orleans.

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Encore Magazine regularly covers topics pertaining to news, arts, entertainment, food, and city life in Wilmington. It also maintains schedules and listings of local events like concerts, festivals, live performance art and think-tank events. Encore Magazine is an entity of H&P Media, which also powers Wilmington’s local ticketing platform, 910tix.com. Print and online editions are updated every Wednesday.

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